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The best Hearthstone decks for beginners

best hearthstone decks

Just starting Hearthstone and too confused to get much further than the tutorial? We are here to help with a collection of the best Hearthstone decks for beginners. These are not the best Hearthstone decks ever, but they are the ones you can build, play, and win with as a you get to grips with these colossally popular CCG. With a minimum of spending, these Hearthstone decks will get you climbing the ranks, winning packs, and opening legendaries.

Has Hearthstone’s Year of the Raven caught your eye but you don’t have the dust to craft the more expensive cards? We are here to help you get ahead with some standard decks that can be built for the cost of one legendary minion, or less.

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Obviously, you won’t be able to top the best decks in the meta, but with these budget decks you’ll be able to go toe to toe with the less popular decks. You’ll also start to earn all the gold you need to build towards the more powerful cards in the current year.

Rush Warrior Hearthstone deck – 1,480 dust

Hearthstone decks Warrior

Warrior cards 

Neutral cards 

  • 1x Town Crier
  • 2x Execute
  • 2x Heroic Strike
  • 2x Redband Wasp
  • 1x Slam
  • 2x Woodcutter’s Axe
  • 2x Frothing Berserker
  • 2x Rabid Worgen
  • 2x Kor’kron Elite
  • 2x Militia Commander
  • 2x Arcanite Reaper
  • 2x Southsea Deckhand
  • 1x Acidic Swamp Ooze
  • 2x Bloodsail Raider
  • 2x Fiery War Axe
  • 2x Hench-Clan Thug
  • 1x Spellbreaker

Aggressive decks are the flavour of the month at the start of any giant meta shift. They often capitalise on control decks tweaking their lists and tempo decks testing out the best cards for their respective mana slots. 

With a new weapon, Woodcutter’s Axe, available at the 2 mana slot, and the buff it provides when destroyed, with this deck your minions will have more value and gain the additional Rush tag. 

The inclusion of six weapons also means you can justify running a small Pirate package that benefits from a weapon being equipped. And with all that power behind you, you’ll want to stick it right in the face of your opponent as much as you can. 

Ideally, you want to use the rush minions to leverage board control while protecting the Frothing Berserker and Raging Worgen. 

As you earn more dust you might want to look at cards like Leeroy Jenkins, Grommash Hellscream, and a few more late-game cards. Or, if the meta allows for a more rush-orientated deck, you’ll want to scout out the Town Crier and Darius Crowley.

See this Warrior deck build on Hearthpwn

Murloc Paladin Hearthstone deck – 1,600 dust

Hearthstone decks Paladin

Paladin cards 

Neutral cards 

  • 2x Righteous Protector
  • 2x Hydrologist
  • 2x Blessing of Kings
  • 2x Truesilver Champion
  • 2x Grimscale Oracle
  • 2x Murloc Tidecaller
  • 2x Bluegill Warrior
  • 2x Knife Juggler
  • 2x Murloc Tidehunter
  • 2x Novice Engineer
  • 2x Rockpool Hunter
  • 2x Murloc Warleader
  • 2x Primalfin Lookout
  • 2x Spellbreaker
  • 2x Stormwind Champion

Murlocs are a whole load of fun. With their infectious battlecry and ability to absolutely steamroll unprepared players, they can be a devastating force. Capitalising on the synergies between their tribal cards, plus the added bonus of having the Murloc Hydrologist in Paladin, means that there’s no better class to test out your gilled buddies. 

Due to the board-flooding nature of Murlocs, your aim will be to ensure that you drop as many cards as possible behind the likes of Knife Juggler and Murloc Tidecaller to squeeze every bit of damage out of the deck. After you’ve established a strong board of Murlocs, you’ll want to drop your Murloc Warleader for additional damage. 

Should your opponent start to fight back, you’ll need to use your Truesilver Champion to beat down their minions or while your cards continue to go face. You’ll also want to keep an eye out for pesky taunts and push past them with your Spellbreaker or destroy them with that cheeky Blessing of Kings in your hand.

If you do end up enjoying Murloc Paladin then you’ll want to save up enough to invest in some Gentle Megasaurs instead of Stormwind Champion. You should also look to replace the Novice Engineers for Divine Favours. If you are exceptionally flush with dust then you can also look to craft Call to Arms and Sunkeeper Tarim. 

See this Paladin deck build on Hearthpwn.  

Budget Hunter Hearthstone deck – 1,120 dust

Hearthstone decks Hunter

Hunter cards 

Neutral cards

  • 2x Tracking
  • 2x Crackling Razormaw
  • 2x Scavenging Hyena
  • 2x Animal Companion
  • 1x Bearshark
  • 2 Eaglehorn Bow
  • 2x Kill Command
  • 2x Unleash the Hounds
  • 2x Dire Frenzy
  • 2x Houndmaster
  • 2x Tundra Rhino
  • 2x Savannah Highmane
  • 2x Dire Mole
  • 1x Stonetusk Boar
  • 2x Vicious Scalehide
  • 2x Vicious Fledgling

There was a time where Hunter was king. The class’s ability to curve out and play the perfect card every turn while applying insane pressure meant that it was one of the most dominant decks in the meta. Now, with the addition of a few interesting Witchwood cards, Hunter looks like it might be one of the better low-cost decks in the meta. 

With the budget Hunter deck, you should mostly aim to play on curve and fill any empty turns with your hero power to continue to apply pressure. There’s no real need to worry about discarding cards with tracking as your as your goal is to finish the game long before you hit fatigue. You do this by establishing a strong board in the early turns through trading efficiently, and then capitalise on that momentum in later turns. 

In terms of cards to aim for in this deck, there aren’t many. Hunter is thankfully one of the cheaper classes and a lot of choices ultimately come down to the meta at the time. That doesn’t mean you can’t keep an eye on a finisher like Leeroy Jenkins or King Krush.

See this Hunter deck build on Hearthpwn

Questing Adventurer/Miracle Rogue Hearthstone deck – 1,600 dust

Hearthstone decks Rogue

Rogue cards 

Neutral cards

  • 2x Backstab
  • 2x Preparation
  • 2x Shadowstep
  • 2x Cold Blood
  • 1x Deadly Poison
  • 2x Eviscerate
  • 2x Razorpetal Lasher
  • 2x Sap
  • 2x Shiv
  • 2x Fan of Knives
  • 2x Assassinate
  • 1x Assassin’s Blade
  • 1x Vanish
  • 1x Sprint
  • 2x Southsea Deckhand
  • 2x Questing Adventurer
  • 1x Gadgetzan Auctioneer
  • 1x Reckless Rocketeer

If tempo and aggro decks aren’t quite your thing the Miracle Rogue ought to add a bit of flavour to your playstyle. Every turn is a nailbiter as your try to work out if your opponent can kill you or if you’re able to stave off death for one more turn, especially with so few instant heals available in the current playable standard sets. 

The goal of Miracle Rogue is to cycle your deck through the use of Gadgetzan Auctioneer and your cheap spells while stalling your opposition with cards like Sap and Vanish. When you’ve assembled enough cards to play your charge minions with Cold Blood, you’ll want to rush it straight to your opponent’s face and kill them outright. You’ll also want to try to combine the high amount of cycle with your Questing Adventurers so that they are nice and bulky.

Within Miracle Rogue there are some obvious substitutes you can build towards: instead of the Reckless Rocketeer, you’ll want to cross your fingers for Leeroy Jenkins; Questing Adventurers can be replaced with Edwin Van Cleef; Assassinate is easily usurped by the Vilespine Slayer; you’ll want a second Gadgetzan instead of a Sprint; and you might want to cut your Razorpetal Lashers for Fal’dorei Striders. 

That’s not to say the deck doesn’t work in a budget format, but implementing these changes as and when possible will see an incremental increase in your win percentage. Alternatively, you could run with a more Echo/Witchwood-based deck and include the likes of Cheap Shot, Spectral Cutlass, WANTED!, Blink Fox, and Mistwraith package.

See this Rogue deck build on Hearthpwn

Warlock Zoo Hearthstone deck – 1,580 dust

Hearthstone decks Warlock

Warlock cards 

Neutral cards

  • 2x Flame Imp
  • 2x Kobold Librarian
  • 2x Soulfire
  • 2x Voidwalker
  • 1x Demonfire
  • 2x Vulgar Homunculus
  • 2x Doomguard
  • 2x Acherus Veteran
  • 2x Dire Wolf Alpha
  • 2x Knife Juggler
  • 2x Tar Creeper
  • 2x Vicious Fledgling
  • 2x Mad Hatter
  • 1x Saronite Chain Gang
  • 2x Spellbreaker
  • 2x Fungalmancer

Zoo has been around since the dawn of time. As one of the cheapest and most flexible decks in Hearthstone, it has provided a great number of players with a quick way to the top. As seasons passed by and sets rotated out, Warlock has always been able to use its core cards to support Zoo’s game plan, while adding the latest expansion’s best cards for flavour. 

It’s all about value when it comes to this deck. You’ll want to trade up your smaller minions to maintain a good board presence while ensuring that your opponent is consistently whittled down by the pressure you have. When you find yourself in a tight spot and in need of cards, don’t be scared to use your hero power to draw another card – the sacrifice is always worth it. 

As Zoo is such a flexible deck, you can opt to include more demon synergy by adding cards like Blood Imp or the new Witchwood Imp alongside Despicable Dreadlord and a second Demonfire. Alternatively, you could opt for a more self-destructive Zoo deck and include the likes of Dark Possession, Duskbat, Deathweb Spider, and Blood Witch to utilise the unique cards released in Witchwood for additional flavour.

See this Warlock deck build on Hearthpwn

Improving your Hearthstone collection

You do not have to spend money to play Hearthstone but the option is there. While investing a small amount of money in the game will not necessarily give you an immediate winrate bump, it will give you access to a much wider selection of cards. That selection will subsequently improve the options available to you when it comes to building a deck, and will give you an advantage over an opponent who has a limited selection of cards.

There are three ways to collect new cards in Hearthstone and all of them are available to you without spending a single penny. 

  • Buying packs: There is a choice of three different packs in the Hearthstone store, from each of the last three expansions plus the classic set. This is the main avenue through which the Hearthstone development team introduces new cards to the game. These packs cost 100 gold or around £2.99 each if you decide you want to open your wallet. There is also the Welcome Bundle, which is recommended for all players as it gives ten packs and a random legendary for £3.99/$5, but can only be purchased once.
  • Earn cards: As you level up each of the game’s nine classes you will be rewarded with cards from the basic set. These cards are not available in packs and cannot be disenchanted or crafted as they are part of the core set.
  • Crafting: You can craft cards that you want to include in a deck by spending ethereal dust which is obtained by destroying cards. The rate on return is fairly low, with four disenchants required to make a card of that rarity, so we would suggest you think very hard before destroying – or ‘disenchanting’ – any cards that you only have one or two copies of.

For those of you that have just picked up the game, the Welcome Bundle detailed above offers you the best value for money we have ever seen in terms of card collection. On top of this, you’re also able to partake in weekly Tavern Brawls that will reward you with a free Standard pack for your first win, complete an initial run of Dungeon Run for extra packs, and vote for your favourite players at specific Hearthstone tournaments throughout the year. 

You’ll also be notified of special events when booting up Hearthstone – like the recently finished Year of the Raven celebration – that allow you to earn additional packs for a limited period.

PCGN

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